Encroaching Satin Stitch

This type of satin stitch is used to cover a larger area of the pattern. This allows smaller and tighter satin stitches to be used instead of long and saggy ones. The pattern is broken up into smaller horizontal or vertical sections. Then, each section, at a time, is covered with satin stitch. The important thing to remember is that the satin stitch in the next row will always begin from between the two stitches from the previous row. This kind of stitch can be used wonderfully with threads of different shades.

You need to know the satin stitch to be able to do this stitch. I will work on a leaf pattern.

Fig 1: I first divide the leaf pattern into sections. I have done 4 sections. This is to aid your stitching and also this tutorial. But, once you learn this stitch, making such sections is only a choice of convenience. Fig 2: Bring the needle out from the edge of the first stitch line as in the illustration. Every stitch will be done straight.
Fig 3: Now, start doing the satin stitch to fill in the first section of the leaf. Such smaller satin stitches are more durable and good to look at. Fig 4: Once you finish one section, it will look like this. Continue and bring the needle out from the second stitch line to fill the second section.
Fig 5: You continue to fill up the next section with satin stitch as well. The only thing to be careful about is to set the stitches between two stitches of the previous section. See the illustration. Fig 6: You continue the procedure of ‘encroaching’ between the stitches of the previous sections where they share the same stitch line. This is what gives the stitch its name.
Fig 7: A finished pattern of leaf will look like this. If you click on the image, you will get a zoomed version where you can probably make out the ‘encroachments’.
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26 Responses

  1. sheril Saudi Arabia Google Chrome Windows says:

    can’t we do this stitch with normal sewing thread?

    • sarah India Internet Explorer Windows says:

      This thread is not as thick as it looks. A normal sewing yarn would be too thin to do this stitch. You will understand this when you try stitching. The thicker the thread, the easier it is to fill and better to see.

  2. jenessa Saudi Arabia Google Chrome Windows says:

    is it necessary to do this stitch with a thick thread?
    can’t we do it with normal sewing thread?

    • sarah India Internet Explorer Windows says:

      Dear Jenessa,

      This thread is not as thick as it looks. 🙂 A normal sewing yarn would be too thin to do this stitch. You will understand this when you try stitching. The thicker the thread, the easier it is to fill and better to see.

  3. safia United States Opera Mini Unknow Os says:

    Thankz a lot Sarah
    But I want to know that does it make any damage to the fabric?
    And I think it wl be nice if the lines[partition]wl be horizontal

    • sarah India Internet Explorer Windows says:

      Dear Safia,

      This stitch shoudl not damage any fabric!
      You can always experiment with horizontal partition…and maybe even share your attempt with us. 🙂

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