Posts Tagged 'stitch family'

picture dictionary

Posted by on 24 Nov 2011 | Category:

This picture dictionary will help you to identify the stitches based on how they look. Hovering over the stitch picture will display the stitch name. Clicking over the picture will take you to the respective tutorial pages.

Back stitch family
back_stitch_index whipped_back_stitch_index threaded_back_stitch_index pekinese_back_stitch_index herringbone_ladder_filling_stitch_index
split_back_stitch_index        
         
Blanket stitch family
blanket_stitch_index buttonhole_stitch_index whipped_buttonhole_stitch_index  double_blanket_stitch_index   closed_blanket_stitch_index
crossed_blanket_stitch_index buttonhole_wheel_index buttonhole_wheel_cup_index rossette_of_thorns_index  buttonhole_bar_stitch_index 
barb_stitch_index mirrored_buttonhole_index   german_knotted_index  blanket_stitch_honeycomb_index  
Chain stitch family
 chain_stitch_index whipped_chain_stitch_index double_chain_stitch_index magic_chain_stitch_index lazy_daisy_index
russian_stitch_index long_tailed_daisy_index  feathered_chain_stitch_index basque_stitch_index  petal_chain_stitch_index
reverse_chain_stitch_index heavy_chain_stitch_index braided_chain_stitch_index  zig_zag_chain_stitch_index cable_chain_stitch_index
twisted_chain_stitch_index alternating_twisted_chain_index  barred_chain_stitch_index  alternating_barred_chain_index  rossette_stitch_index
rope_stitch_index tulip_stitch_index  bulls_head_index  detached_wheatear_stitch_index  wheater_stitch_index
oyster_stitch_index butterfly_chain_stitch_index  raised_chain_band_index  knotted_chain_stitch_index  knotted_cable_chain_index
 open_chain_stitch_index        
 
Chevron stitch family
chevron_stitch_index detached_chevron_stitch_index threaded_chevron_stitch_index mirrored_chevron_stitch_index stagerred_chevron_stitch_index
 double_chevron_stitch_index  chevron_filling_stitch_index      
         
Cross stitch family
cross_stitch_index double_cross_stitch_index       
         
Fishbone stitch family
fishbone_stitch_index  open_fishbone_stitch_index  flat_stitch_index  raised_fishbone_stitch_index  
         
Feather stitch family
feather_stitch_index closed_feather_stitch_index single_feather_stitch_index double_feather_stitch_index maidenhair_stitch_index
cretan_stitch_index  closed_cretan_stitch_index open_cretan_stitch_index knotted_cretan_stitch_index scottish_cretan_stitch_index
         
Fly stitch family
fly_stitch_index  whipped_fly_stitch_index closed_fly_stitch_index  plaited_fly_stitch_index  twisted_fly_stitch_index
 crossed_fly_stitch_filling_index        
         
Herringbone stitch family
herringbone_stitch_index threaded_herrigbone_stitch_index tacked_herringbone_stitch_index tied_herringbone_stitch_index laced_herringbone_stitch_index
 double_herringbone_stitch_index  twisted lattice band  interlaced_herringbone_index    
         
Knots family
french_knot_index pistil_stitch_index  colonial_knot_index  coral_stitch_index  scroll_stitch_index
 chinese_knot_index  pearl_knot_index bullion_knot_index  closed_pearl_knot_index  knotted_pearl_stitch_index
 palestrina_stitch_index reversed_palestrina_index triple_palestrina_stitch_index  basque_knot_index  sorbello_stitch_index
         
Running stitch family
running_stitch_index looped_running_stitch_index laced_running_stitch_index  interlaced_running_stitch_index  whipped_running_stitch_index
 eskimo_laced_edging_index  parallel_running_stitch_index  stepped_running_stitch_index  holbein_stitch_index  darning_stitch_index
 japanese_darning_stitch_index  seed_stitch_index      
         
Satin stitch family
satin_stitch_index whipped_satin_stitch_index  padded_satin_stitch_index  encraoching_satin_stitch_index  brick_stitch_index 
         
Stem stitch family
stem_stitch_index whipped_stem_stitch_index  outline_stitch_index  cable_stitch_index  split_stitch_index
portugese_stem_stitch_index japanese_stitch_index       
         
Straight stitch family
straight_stitch_index fern_stitch_index algerian_eyelet_index diamond_eyelet_stitch_index ray_stitch_index
radiating_stitch_index lantern_stitch_index eyelet_wheels_index eyelet_stitch_index rhodes_stitch_index
arrow_head_index arrow_head_threaded_index rice_stitch_index    
Weaving stitch family     
woven_circle_index woven_oval_index woven_spider_wheel_index whipped_spider's_wheel_index god's_eye_stitch
weaving_stitch_index woven_trellis_stitch_index  woven_bars_index     

knotted cretan stitch

Posted by on 21 Nov 2011 | Category:

This is a variation of the cretan stitch. It shows a technique where knots can be added on the elbows to give it a decorative look. The thicker the thread, the bigger the knot that will be formed. It can look similar to a zig zaged coral stitch.

I will work between four parallel stitch lines. You need to know the cretan stitch to be able to continue with this tutorial.

knotted_cretan_stitch_1        knotted_cretan_stitch_2
Fig 1: Start by taking the needle out through B, then in through D and C, as you would for the cretan stitch.   Fig 2: Now, take the needle in through the stitch. Keep the thread below the needle as shown and pull the needle out to form a knot at the ‘elbow’. Then, move to making the next stitch.
     
knotted_cretan_stitch_3   Fig 3: A finished structure of knotted cretan stitch would look like this.
     

scottish cretan stitch

Posted by on 15 Nov 2011 | Category:

The scottish cretan stitch is a decorative variation of the cretan stitch. Blocks of cretan stitches are made to make beautiful pattern for border. The look can be varied by making the cretan stitches bigger or smaller, or closed or open.

You need to know the cretan stitch to be able to learn this variation.

scottish_cretan_stitch_1        scottish_cretan_stitch_2
Fig 1: Start by making a few cretan stitches. In the illustration, I have a set of three stitches on either sides. Now, take the needle under the stitches on the left side, without plucking the fabric below.   Fig 2: Now, turn around the needle and take the needle under the stitches on the right side, as shown. This finishes one ‘block’ of the scottish cretan stitch.
Continue making such blocks of cretan stitch and repeat the process.
     
 scottish_cretan_stitch_3    Fig 3: A row of this stitch would look like this. I have used closed cretan stitch to do this row.
     

cretan stitch family

Posted by on 25 Oct 2011 | Category:

This family of stitches originated in the island of Crete, Greece. The women of this region have been using cretan stitch and its variations for several centuries.  

This stitch has a technical style similar to the feather stitch. So, I have put the cretan stitch family as under the feather stitch.

Cretan stitch is versetile and can be used in different ways to create different effects. For instance, by just changing the angle of the stitch, a new look can be created. The tutorials will explain this better.

I have divided this family into the following members:
1. Cretan stitch
2. Closed cretan stitch
3. Open cretan stitch
4. Scottish cretan stitch
5. Knotted cretan stitch

Each of these stitches, essentially, follows the same technique and differs only slightly from each other. They are used in accordance with the visual differences they make. When teamed up with other embellishing stitches, this family can be wonderful to work with. :)

basic stitches

Posted by on 01 Jan 2009 | Category:

Stitching or sewing has a history dating back to the prehistoric times. It is believed, with archaeological evidences, that sewing must have come into being since the stone ages, when people had begun to sew to attach pieces of animal skin using needles made of bones, antlers and ivory. They probably must have used threads made of animal parts like veins.

As the times progressed and sewing started to become an integral part of life, not only newer methods of sewing styles developed, but many other materials were tried as needles and threads. For many thousands of years, sewing or stitching was done exclusively by hands. Later, machines which helped to assist sewing and weaving were developed. The invention of sewing machines in 19th century and computerization in the 20th century, led to a revolution in the textile industry with mass production of sewn objects.

Although sewing or stitching is commonly associated with clothing and fabrics, it must not be forgotten that this skill is used in many other craft areas like making shoes, bags, sporting goods and all those things associated with attaching pieces of fabric. Sewing also comprises a wider range of art in the textile industry like embroidery, tapestry, quilting, applique, weaving etc…

This tutorial will deal with one of such arts: hand embroidery, which is very much practiced even today in spite of all the invasion of machine-made,
‘perfect’ sewn objects. It should be admitted, though, that it is a dying art with hobbyists finding lesser time and patience. On the flip side, hand embroidery is an important means of livelihood to many people in different countries.

There are more than 400 types of different stitches from around the globe and even more types of hand embroideries. When certain stitches are combined in certain ways to create a certain style of stitching, it is known as hand embroidery. The stitches and associated hand embroideries can speak volumes of the history of its people, culture and times.

This section of the tutorial will teach you the various stitches. These stitches are categorized based on certain families they belong to. These families are distinguished based on the nature of technique used to create a parrticular stitch. It is possible that some stitches belong to more than one family, but effort has been made to minimize the confusion. 

Hand sewing is an art to be perfected with patience and perseverance. It helps us in creative expression and ultimately gives us a satisfaction that most
other hobbies can give. Happy learning…happy stitching. :)