Posts Tagged 'running stitch family'

darning stitch

Posted by on 13 Nov 2009 | Category:

The darning stitch is about making rows of straight running stitches near each other. The technique of darning is used to mend  torn clothes, especially socks and looks like a woven patch.

A fabric is made of weft and warp yarn. Weft is the yarn that runs vertically, while warp is the yarn that runs horizontally. They interlock with each other to form the fabric. While mending torn fabric, the darning stitch is used to ‘rebuild’ the weft and warp of the worn out area.

This lesson, however, will show you only the ‘back and forth’ stitch technique of darning stitch. The purpose is to use this lesson as reference for Embroidery works (and not to mend clothes 😀 ). The most popular embroidery where darning is used for embroidery purpose is the pattern darning.

You need to know the running stitch to be able to do darning stitch.

darning_stitch_1
Fig 1: Do a row of running stitch, starting from A and ending at B. Then, turn around and begin the second row of running stitch from C to end at D. Keep this process of stitching rows of running stitches back and forth. Note that each row is ‘stepped’ in order to get a brick like formation.

You can turn a couple of rows of darning stitch into a base for beautiful patterns like we did in parallel running stitch and stepped running stitch.

stepped running stitch

Posted by on 25 Oct 2009 | Category:

Stepped running stitch is just two parallel rows of running stitches. Each stitch from each row will lie in between two stitches of the other row. This ‘stepped’ structure will give an opportunity to create various embroidery patterns using a different thread. You may make more than just two rows of running stitch and try out your own variations as well.

stepped running stitch
Stepped running stitch : Lay the foundation by doing two parallel rows of running stitches . ‘Step’ the second row, as illustrated. Note that A lies between W and X, X lies between A and B, and so forth.
     
Variety 1    
stepped running stitch (variety1) 1     stepped running stitch (variety1) 2
Fig 1: Take another thread and needle out from near A and pass it under A and W without plucking the fabric underneath. Now, turn the needle around and pass the thread under X and A.   Fig 2: Now, pass the needle under B and X, without plucking the fabric underneath.  Continue this pattern of action for the remaining stretch of the stepped running stitch.
   
stepped running stitch (variety1) 3
Fig 3: The final effect would be as shown above.
 
Variety 2    
stepped running stitch (variety2) 1   stepped running stitch (variety2) 2
Fig 1: Take another thread from near W and pass it under W and A, wihtout plucking the fabric underneath.
Now, pass the needle under the thread, and then under X, as shown in the picture. You will get your first twisted pattern.
  Fig 2: Again, taking the needle from beneath the thread, pass it from under B. This makes the second twisted pattern. Continue this action for the entire stretch of the stepped runnig stitch.
     
stepped running stitch (variety2) 3
Fig 3:  Continue this ‘twisted’ pattern to give it a final braided effect.

 

parallel running stitch

Posted by on 24 Oct 2009 | Category:

Parallel running stitch is just two parallel rows of running stitches,with  each stitch from each row lying one below the other. Using these as the base, many variations can be created using a different thread. I have illustrated the parallel running stitch here and two different ways it could be used. You can try out your own variations. 🙂

parallel running stitch
Parallel running stitch: Lay the foundation by doing two parallel twin lines of running stitch as illustrated. Note that the stitches W, X, Y, Z lie right below A, B, C and D.
       
Variety 1    
This variety makes a good edging or boundary design by giving a snake like effect. You may also incorporate some beadwork to add beauty to the work.
parallel running stitch (variety1) 1       Fig 1:  Take another thread and bring it out from near A. Take the needle under the stitches A and W, as shown. Turn around the needle and take it from under X and B. Again, turn around the needle and take it from under C and Y. Continue this process for the entire length of the two parallel rows.
Make sure not to pluck the fabric underneath, while doing this.
     
parallel running stitch (variety1) 2  
Fig 2:  A finished line of this variety would look like this. The serpentine visual makes it good for edging and boundary designs.
 
Variety 2    
Again, this variety makes a good edging or boundary design by giving a inverted ‘U’ like effect. You may also incorporate some beadwork to add beauty to the work.
 parallel running stitch (variety2) 1    Fig 1:  Now, take another thread and bring it out from near A. Take the needle under the stitches A and W, as shown. Turn around the needle and take it from under A again.
Continue this action by taking the needle under B and X, C and Y, and so forth.
Make sure not to pluck the fabric while doing this.
     
 parallel running stitch (variety2) 2
Fig 2:  This is how a finished line of this variety sample would look like.

holbein stitch

Posted by on 22 Feb 2009 | Category:

Also known as : Double running stitch, Line stitch, Two-sided Line stitch, Two-sided Stroke stitch, Square stitch, Chiara stitch

This stitch follows a pattern where a running stitch is done and the gaps between this running stitch is filled during a return journey of the needle and thread. This causes the stitch to bring out identical patterns on either sides of the cloth.

Looking at the history of it, holbein stitch derives its name from Hans Holbein the younger, who was a German artist. He was a portrait painter of the 16th century, who is more known to have painted Henry VIII and his children wearing clothing with ‘blackwork embroidery’.

Holbein stitch is widely used in Blackwork Embroidery and Assissi Embroidery as well. We can widely see it in cross stitch patterns too. This is because holbein stitch is a form of counted thread stitch.

Black work is again commonly known as spanish work. Catherine of Aragon was the wife of Henry VIII. She is believed to have brought garments in to England from Spain and they had black work on them. Black work is done using only black thread.

Assissi embroidery originated from Italy at around 13th and 14th century. It is a combination of black work, or holbein stitch and cross stitch. Traditionally Assissi embroidery employed only holbein stitch, but later, it incorporated varities of cross stitches as well. Assissi embroidery is not confined to a single thread color but uses different threads.
 
I have done two variations of the holbein stitch. This will help understand the technique.

Variation 1:
  
holbein stitch pattern 1_1
Fig 1: Lay a base of running stitch.
 
holbein stitch pattern 1_2       Fig 2: Now, start a return journey with the same working thread. As, shown in this illustration, the return journey of running stitch will fill the gaps made during the first onward journey.
You can use a different colored thread for creative effects.
     
     
holbein stitch pattern 1_3
Fig 3: A  finished line of holbein stitch would look like this.

 
Variation 2:

holbein_stitch_pattern2_1       holbein stitch pattern 2_2
Fig 1: Follow the alphabets to make a step of running stitches along the four stitch lines. Note that all the stitches would be horizontal.   Fig 2: Do a return journey by filling up the gaps left by teh first onward journey of the running stitch. This time all the stitches would be vertical.
You can use a different colored thread fro the return journey for a more creative holbein stitch.
     
holbein stitch pattern 2_3
Fig 3: A finished ‘temple’ design using holbein stitch would look like this.