Posts Tagged 'redwork'

summer workshop

Posted by on 31 Mar 2011 | Category:

Hand Embroidery Workshop

Location: Pashan-Panchvati, Pune

Complete stitch kit will be provided.

 
Embroideries taught:

redwork   Redwork

 

An old embroidery style in red or blue using various stitches.
Can be used over any kind of furnishings or children’s clothes and materials.

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Chicken Scratch

 

An old embroidery from early America, using few stitches to give a laced effect. Can be used to make over anything made from checkered cloth.

 

chicken_scratch

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kutch   Kutch Embroidery

 

A traditional Indian embroidery from Gujarat. Uses a little complicated stitch to make wonderful embroidery patterns on furnishings and clothes.

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Kasuti

 

A traditional Indian embroidery from Karnataka. Uses four different styles of stitches to create intricate designs over small furnishings and clothing like sarees and blouses.

 

kasuti

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sashiko   Sashiko

 

A traditional Japanese embroidery done in white over dark blue using a single type of stitch. Contemporarily, this embroidery technique is used with different threads and fabric over furnishings and clothing of any sort.

 

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Basic Stitches

 

Introduces 50 basic stitches to beginners for skill development. Students will get an idea about the different types and levels of stitches, giving them practice in stitching and developing an interest in hand art. These stitches can be used as per the imagination of the student for various projects.

 

basic stitch

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For information and registration, contact:
Tel: 8275697147 /         Email: juby.sarah@gmail.com
         

 

 

bluework lessons

Posted by on 08 Aug 2009 | Category:

This is just to give a feel on how bluework will look like.

Bluework and redwork share the same history. Only that, bluework came as a successor to redwork when a new colorfast blue thread was available in the market. Later, a lot many other colors came into availability and many other threads were experimented with. Contemporarily, bluework has been done in many shades of blue in a single design. I have used anchor thread number 0162 to work on the below given design.

Here is a step by step procedure on how this  design was completed in bluework. Click on the stitch names to go to the lessons of each stitch.

bluework_1   bluework_2
I have traced the design to a white cotton fabric using carbon paper.
 
bluework_3 Back stitch:
I began by making the girl’s face, hands and feet using this stitch.
bluework_4 Lazy daisy:
The flower pattern on the frock is done in lazy daisy. I also made the girl’s eyes and ribbons using this stitch.
bluework_5 French knot:
The best way to fill in dots or small circles is using french knots, which I did on the frock, at the centre of each flower pattern.
bluework_6 Outline stitch:
The outline stitch was used  for the frock, shawl, and hat as it would give a thicker easy flowing look.
bluework_7 Split stitch:
The split stitch looked good for the hair as it would give a thicker look. Two strands of the blue floss were taken and doubled, so that the ‘spliting’ is easy.
bluework_8 Running stitch:
The design on the shawl was apt for a running stitch.
bluework_9 Straight stitch:
I added finer details to the girl by making single straight stitches (single running stitch). I made its eyebrows, eyelashes and the stem pattern on the frock using straight stitches.
bluework_10 Stem stitch:
I used this stitch to do the flowers.
bluework_11 Our finished ‘dutch girl’ would look like this.Click on the image for a bigger version. 

Note: This design helped me to incorporate all the stitches traditionally used in redwork and bluework helping me to explain this lesson to you. Contemporarily, different kinds of straight stitches can be used to work these embroideries.This free design called ‘dutch girl’  has been borrowed from needlecrafter.com.

redwork lessons

Posted by on 08 Aug 2009 | Category:

 
In this tutorial, the step by step process on how I went about finishing this design is mentioned. You may click on the stitch name to go to the lessons of those stitches. I have used anchor thread number 47.

redwork_1   redwork_2
I have traced the design to a white cotton fabric using carbon paper.
 
redwork_3 Back stitch:
I began to start the embroidery with back stitch. Personally, I felt it will be good to make the girl’s legs, hands and face using this stitch.
redwork_4 Outline stitch:
The outline stitch was used  for the frock as it would give a thicker straight looking flow stitch.
redwork_5 Running stitch:
The design on the girl’s frock was apt for a running stitch. Usually, running stitch is good for making strawberry seeds. I used this stitch to even do the glow around the candle light.
redwork_6 Lazy daisy:
All the flower pattern in this design is done in lazy daisy. The girl’s yawning mouth is also done using a single lazy daisy.
redwork_7 Stem stitch:
Just to demonstrate the stitch, I decided to incorporate this into the candle stand.
redwork_8 Split stitch:
I felt the split stitch was apt for the hair as it would give a thicker fuller stitch. I took two strands of the red floss and doubled it, so that the ‘spliting’ is easy.
redwork_9 French knot:
The best way to fill in dots or small circles is using french knots, which I did on the frock and at the centre of each flower pattern.
redwork_10 Straight stitch:
Finally, I gave the finishing touch to the girl by making single straight stitches (single running stitch). I made its eyebrows, eyes, knees, and inside of ribbon using single straight stitches.
redwork_11 Our finished ‘sleepytime girl’ looks like this. :)Click on the image for a bigger version. 

 

Note: This design helped me to incorporate all the stitches traditionally used in redwork and bluework helping me to explain this lesson to you. Contemporarily, different kinds of straight stitches can be used to work these embroideries. This free design called ‘sleepytime girls’  has been borrowed from needlecrafter.com.

french knot

Posted by on 04 Aug 2009 | Category:

French knot is one of the easiest of all knots. Interestingly, however, it is often hailed as the one of the most difficult-to-handle or difficult-to-do stitches. This, so much so, that learners often end up hating to do this stitch. I personally feel it is one of the most creatively use-able stitches once learnt, and not much of a deal.

This stitch can be used to do little flowers, or as a filling stitch to fill in small circles and centre of flowers. Many closely done french knots can give a ‘woolly’ appearance and can be used creatively. You use both hands to do this stitch, so I would advise you read the instructions also to understand the illustrations. 🙂

 french_knot_1   french_knot_2
Fig 1: Bring the needle out through A.   Fig 2: Now, place the needle close to the fabric. Wrap the thread around it twice, as shown.
     
french_knot_3   french_knot_4
Fig 3: Keep the longer end of the thread pulled with your fingers while putting the needle back in a point just close to A or even through A. 
This is probably what you have to master. The trick is: if you are holding the needle with your right hand fingers, wrap the thread and hold it pulled with your left hand fingers. Vice versa.  This makes it easy to pull back the needle without the risk of pulling out of the wrapped thread, to put it back into the point A. If this seems difficult for you, try this: after wrapping the thread, turn the needle around about 180 degrees and then try to put it in A or near A.
         Fig 4:Pull down the needle through the fabric. You will see your first french knot formed.