Posts Tagged 'knot stitch'

pearl knot stitch

Posted by on 24 Jun 2011 | Category:

This stitch is a very simple stitch worked from right to left. Make these stitches close enough to see it look like like a string of pearls, which explains the name.

I will be working over a single stitch line.

pearl_knot_1 …. pearl_knot_2
Fig 1: Begin by bringing out the needle at the right end on the stitch line, at a point A. Then, take the needle through B, which lies on the stitch line and bring it out from C, a point right below B. Fig 2: Now, before pulling the stitch A-B tight, take the needle under it as shown. Do not pluck the fabric underneath.
….
pearl_knot_3 pearl_knot_4
Fig 3: Pull the needle out completely to get the first knot. Then, again, take the needle in through D, which lies on the stitch line and bring it out through E, a point right below D. The shorter this stitch, the more ’round’ and ‘pearled’ the look.
Continue the procedure for the entire length of the stitch line.
Fig 4: A completed row of pearl stitch would look like this.
….

stitch dictionary

Posted by on 06 Jun 2010 | Category:

The stitch dictionary is arranged in alphabetical order and will help you to go to a stitch directly. Just click on the alphabet given in the index to go to the stitch beginning with that alphabet. Some stitches are known by multiple names and all names are included here. Hovering over the stitch names will give you the most common name by which the stitch is known.


A .B . C . D . E .F .G . H I . J . K . L . M .N . O .P . Q.R . S . T . U .V .W .X . Y .Z


A
Alternating barred chain
Alternating twisted chain stitch
Antwerp edging stitch
index

B
Back stitch
Back stitched spider’s web
Barb stitch
Barred chain
Barred witch stitch
Basket stitch
Basque knot
Basque loop stitch
Basque stitch
Blanket stitch
Blanket stitch honeycomb
Blanket stitch scallops
Blind knot
Bonnet stitch
Braided chain stitch
Berwick stitch
Bulls head
Bullion knot
Bullion stitch
Butterfly chain stitch
Buttonhole bar stitch
Buttonhole stitch
Buttonhole wheel
Buttonhole wheel cup
index

C
Cable chain stitch
Cable stitch
Chain stitch
Catch stitch
Caterpillar stitch
Checkered chain band
Chequered chain stitch
Chiara stitch
Chinese knot
Chinese stitch
Closed blanket stitch
Closed cretan stitch
Closed feather stitch
Closed fly stitch
Closed pearl stitch
Coil stitch
Colonial knot
Coral stitch
Coral knotted herringbone stitch
Crested Chain Stitch
Cretan stitch
Crewel stitch
Cross stitch
Crossed blanket stitch
Crossed fly stitch filling
index
D
Damask stitch
Darning stitch
Danish knot
Detached chain stitch
Detached wheat ear stitch
Double blanket stitch
Double chain stitch
Double cross stitch
Double feather stitch
Double herringbone stitch
Double knot stitch
Double running stitch
index

E
Eastern stitch
Encroaching satin stitch
index
F
Feather stitch
Feathered chain
Figure 8 knot
Fishbone stitch
Fishnet stitch
Flat stitch
Fly stitch
Fly stitch filling
Four-legged knot stitch
Forbidden stitch
French knot
index

G
German interlacing stitch
German knot
German knotted blanket stitch
Ghiordes knot
God’s eye stitch
Grub knot
index

H
Half crossed blanket stitch
Head of the bull stitch
Heavy braid chain stitch
Heavy chain stitch
Herringbone stitch
Herringbone Ladder filling stitch
Holbein stitch
index

I
Indian edging stitch
Indian herringbone stitch
Interlaced band
Interlaced herringbone stitch
Interlaced running stitch
index
J
Japanese stitch

K
Knot stitch
Knot stitch edging
Knotted cable chain stitch
Knotted chain stitch
Knotted cretan stitch
Knotted diamond stitch
Knotted herringbone stitch
Knotted loop stitch
Knotted pearl stitch
index

L
Laced cretan stitch
Laced herringbone stitch
Laced running stitch
Ladder stitch
Lazy daisy
Leaf stitch
Leviathan stitch
Line stitch
Long armed feather stitch
Long french knot
Long tailed daisy
Looped running stitch
index

M
Magic chain stitch
Maidenhair stitch
Mirrored blanket stitch
Mossoul stitch
index

N

O
Ojo de Dios
Old english knot stitch
Open chain stitch
Open cretan stitch
Open fishbone stitch
Open loop stitch
Opened fishbone stitch
Outline stitch
Oyster stitch
index

P
Paded satin stitch
Palestrina stitch
Parallel running stitch
Pearl knot
Pekinese stitch
Pendant couching
Persian stitch
Petal chain stitch
Pistil knot
Plaited fly stitch
Plaited stitch
Point de cable
Point de chainette
Point de riz
Point de sable
Porto rico rose
Portugese stem stitch
Post stitch
index
Q
Queen anne stitch, The

R
Raised chain band
Raised fishbone stitch
Raised spider’s web wheel
Reverse chain stitch
Reversed Palestrina
Ribbed spider wheel
Rice stitch
Rice grain stitch
Roman chain stitch
Rope stitch
Rossette stitch
Russian chain stitch
Running stitch
index

S
Satin stitch
Scottish cretan stitch
Scroll stitch
Seed stitch
Seeding stitch
Shaped blanket stitch scallops
Side to side stem stitch
Slipped detached chain
Sinhalese chain stitch
Single feather stitch
Smyrna stitch
Smyrna cross stitch
Snail trail
Sorbello stitch
Split back stitch
Split stitch
Stalk stitch
Stepped running stitch
Stem stitch
Straight stitch
Surface couching
Surrey stitch
Square chain stitch
Square stitch
index

T
Tacked herringbone stitch
Tailored blanket stitch
Tambour stitch
Tete de la boeuf
Threaded back stitch
Threaded herringbone stitch
Tied coral stitch
Tied herringbone stitch
Triple palestrina
Tulip stitch
Turkey rug knot
Twilling stitch
Twisted chain stitch
Twisted daisy border stitch
Twisted fly stitch
Twisted lattice band
Two sided line stitch
Two sided stroke stitch
index
U
  Underside Couching
  Up and down blanket stitch
V
Vandyke chain stitch
index

W
Wave stitch
Wheat ear stitch
Weaving stitch
Whipped back stitch
Whipped buttonhole stitch
Whipped chain stitch
Whipped fly stitch
Whipped running stitch
Whipped satin stitch
Whipped spider wheel
Whipped stem stitch
Witch stitch
Worm stitch
Woven bar
Woven circle
Woven oval
Woven spider wheel
Woven trellis stitch
index
X
Y
Y stitch

Z
Zig zag cable chain stitch
Zig Zag chain stitch
index

bullion knot

Posted by on 01 Dec 2009 | Category:

Also known as: bullion stitch, caterpillar stitch, coil stitch, knot stitch, post stitch, worm stitch, porto rico rose, grub knot

This is an interesting stitch used to make simple motifs. I would say that this is an ‘elongated’ knot which can be used liberally to group together and make dense textures. This stitch gives an embossed look, contibuting to the brazilian embroidery that uses stitches of 3D nature. 🙂

Note to use a Milliners needle for this stitch. A milliners needle has the same thickness throughout its length, thus making the passing of the wound thread through the needle easy. You will be saving a lot of frustration by using this needle. 😀

bullion_knot_1       bullion_knot_2
Fig 1: Bring the needle out through A and put the needle through B at a desired length.   Fig 2: Now, bring the needle out through A again. Then, wind the thread around the needle as shown. The  distance of wound thread should measure the same as the distance between A and B.
Too many or too less wraps will spoil the stitch.
     
bullion_knot_3   bullion_knot_4
Fig 3: Then, hold the wrapped thread with your fingers and pull the needle out with the other finger. Keep pulling the needle completely in an upward direction till the wraps lay on the fabric as shown above. Adjust and straighten the wraps if required and put in the needle back through B.   Fig 4: The finished bullion stitch would look like this. 

coral stitch

Posted by on 09 Sep 2009 | Category:

Also known as: German knot, Snail trail

This stitch is done from right to left. The knots fall in between a trail of straight stitch. This stitch can be used for various different types of embroideries, especially in making stem patterns.

I will be working on a curved stitch line to show the flexibility of the stitch.

coral stitch 1   coral stitch 2
Fig 1: Bring out the needle out from A. Put in the needle through B and bring it out from C, both which lie on either side of the stitch line.   Fig 2: Loop the thread around the needle as shown.
     
coral stitch 3   Fig 3: Pull out the needle and you will see a knot formed. continue with the procedure of making knots.
     
coral stitch 4
Fig 4: A completed line of coral stitch would look like this. It gives a feeling of a thread docked down with tiny stitches. 😀

french knot

Posted by on 04 Aug 2009 | Category:

French knot is one of the easiest of all knots. Interestingly, however, it is often hailed as the one of the most difficult-to-handle or difficult-to-do stitches. This, so much so, that learners often end up hating to do this stitch. I personally feel it is one of the most creatively use-able stitches once learnt, and not much of a deal.

This stitch can be used to do little flowers, or as a filling stitch to fill in small circles and centre of flowers. Many closely done french knots can give a ‘woolly’ appearance and can be used creatively. You use both hands to do this stitch, so I would advise you read the instructions also to understand the illustrations. 🙂

 french_knot_1   french_knot_2
Fig 1: Bring the needle out through A.   Fig 2: Now, place the needle close to the fabric. Wrap the thread around it twice, as shown.
     
french_knot_3   french_knot_4
Fig 3: Keep the longer end of the thread pulled with your fingers while putting the needle back in a point just close to A or even through A. 
This is probably what you have to master. The trick is: if you are holding the needle with your right hand fingers, wrap the thread and hold it pulled with your left hand fingers. Vice versa.  This makes it easy to pull back the needle without the risk of pulling out of the wrapped thread, to put it back into the point A. If this seems difficult for you, try this: after wrapping the thread, turn the needle around about 180 degrees and then try to put it in A or near A.
         Fig 4:Pull down the needle through the fabric. You will see your first french knot formed. 

 

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