Posts Tagged 'indian embroidery'

interlaced herringbone stitch

Posted by on 20 Oct 2011 | Category:

This stitch is beautiful, made by weaving over the double herringbone stitch with another thread of same or different color. This stitch requires patience to learn. Once learnt, it will be very easy to do this stitch, and will never be forgotten! 🙂 Interlaced herringbone stitch forms one of the main stitches for one of the most popular indian embrodieries called Kutch work.

You need to know the double herringbone stitch to be able to continue with this tutorial. This tutorial is best understood by following the illustrations, without much dependence on the description.

double_herringbone_stitch …. Double herringbone stitch: First, make a row of double herringbone stitch as the base.
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interlaced_herringbone_1   interlaced_herringbone_2
Fig 1: Bring the needle out with a contrasting colored thread from the left corner of the double herringbone stitch row. 
Observe that the stitch a-b and c-d lies over the stitch p-q. So, to weave, take the needle under the legs of p-q, as shown. This locks the thread in there.
  Fig 2: Now, take needle over the leg of c-d, again passing under p-q, and over the contrasting thread. Then, go under r-s.
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interlaced_herringbone_3   interlaced_herringbone_4
Fig 3: Keep up with this procedure of weaving around the ‘crossings’  for the upper half of the double herringbone stitch.   Fig 4: When you reach the right end of the double herringbone stitch, turn around the needle, by weaving around, as illustrated.
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interlaced_herringbone_5   interlaced_herringbone_6
Fig 5: We keep up with the same method of weaving, only this time, it is inverse, or upside down. Follow the illustrations to undertand how the needle goes up and down the stitches and threads in a perfect weave.   Fig 6: If you look at a single stitch ( x-y) of the double herringbone stitch, you will see how the threads have passed over and under it alternately.
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interlaced_herringbone_7   interlaced_herringbone_8
Fig 7: Continue this process of weaving for the bottom half of the double cross stitch, until you reach back to the left end. End the weaving at the point from where you began from.   Fig 8: A perfect weave of the interlaced herringbone stitch should show up like this. 🙂
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double herringbone stitch

Posted by on 06 Sep 2011 | Category:

Also known as: Indian herringbone stitch

This stitch lays foundation for many other complicated weavings and variations of herringbone stitch. Like the name suggests, it is a combination of two rows of herringbone stitches made over each other. It also forms an important part of one of the most famous of ethnic indian embroideries called Kutch work, a possible reason why it is also called the Indian herringbone stitch.

herringbone_stitch
Herringbone stitch: First, make a row of herringbone stitch. This will form the foundation, over which we will do the second row of herringbone stitch, slightly woven into it.

double_herringbone_stitch_1 double_herringbone_stitch_2
Fig 1: Bring the needle out from A, put it in through B and then take the needle back out from C, like you would for a herringbone stitch. Make sure A, B and C lies in sync with the stitch points of the previous herringbone stitch, as illustrated.   Fig 2: Now, take your needle above the stitch A-B, but below the stitch of the previous herringbone row. This is an important process.
     
double_herringbone_stitch_3   double:herringbone_stitch_4
Fig 3: Continue with the similar process throughout.   Fig 4: A finished row of double herringbone stitch should show up like this, as though woven into each other. 🙂

laced herringbone stitch

Posted by on 12 Aug 2011 | Category:

Also known as: German interlacing stitch

This stitch requires a base of herringbone stitch, around which we weave using a contrasting colored thread. It is highly decorative and so makes a good stitch for borders.

You need to know the herringbone stitch to be able to continue with this tutorial.

herringbone_stitch
Herringbone stitch: Make a row of herringbone stitch as the base.
 
laced_herringbone_stitch_1    laced_herringbone_stitch_2
Fig 1: Begin from the left end of the herringbone stitch row. Bring out a contrasting colored thread from the centre and take it up and down the ‘legs’ of the cross, as shown.   Fig 2: Go up and down the herringbone stitch and the working thread, like illustrated. We would be encircling each ‘crossing’ of the herringbone stitch.
  …    
laced_heringbone_stitch_3   laced_herringbone_stitch_4
Fig 3: After encircling the first ‘crossing’, we move to the next one.   Fig 4: Continue with the similar pattern of encircling before moving to the next ‘crossing’.
  …    
laced_herringbone_stitch_5   Fig 5: A portion of the finished laced herringbone stitch would look like this.
 …    

tied herringbone stitch

Posted by on 21 Jun 2011 | Category:

Also known as : Knotted herringbone stitch, Coral knotted herringbone stitch

This stitch is done over a base of herringbone stitch. It is an incorporation of coral stitch over herringbone stitch.

You need to know herringbone stitch and coral stitch to be able to do the tied herringbone stitch.

herringbone_stitch
Herringbone stitch: Make a base of herringbone stitch.
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tied_herringbone_stitch_1 …. tied_herringbone_stitch_2
Fig 1: Now using a contrasting thread,  begin by bringng out the needle from the right end of the herringbone stitch, as shown. Now,  start working the coral stitch from right to left. Instead of going through the fabric each time to make a knot, we go under each ‘cross’ of the herringbone stitch. The knot will form over the crossing.   Fig 2: A finished row of tied herringbone would look like this.
 ….    

 

threaded herringbone stitch

Posted by on 06 Jun 2011 | Category:

Also known as: Barred witch stitch

This is a fancy stitch done over a base of herringbone stitch. This stitch looks great for border making.

You need to know how to do herringbone stitch before beginning this tutorial.

herringbone_stitch
Herringbone stitch: Make a row of herringbone stitch for the base.
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threaded_herringbone_stitch_1 …. threaded_herringbone_stitch_2
Fig 1: Bring the needle with a contrasting thread out from the point A as shown. Now, pass the needle under the stitch A-B without plucking the fabric underneath. Fig 2: Now, take a turn and pass the needle under the stitch C-D.
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threaded_herringbone_stitch_3 …. threaded_herringbone_stitch_4
Fig 3: Continue the process of ‘lacing’ between the herringboen stitches. Fig 4: A finished row of laced herringbone stitch looks like this.
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