Posts Tagged 'herring bone stitch'

stitch dictionary

Posted by on 06 Jun 2010 | Category:

The stitch dictionary is arranged in alphabetical order and will help you to go to a stitch directly. Just click on the alphabet given in the index to go to the stitch beginning with that alphabet. Some stitches are known by multiple names and all names are included here. Hovering over the stitch names will give you the most common name by which the stitch is known.


A .B . C . D . E .F .G . H I . J . K . L . M .N . O .P . Q.R . S . T . U .V .W .X . Y .Z


A
   
    Alternating barred chain
    Alternating twisted chain stitch
index    

B
   
    Back stitch
    Back stitched spider’s web
    Barred chain
    Barred witch stitch
    Basque knot
    Basque loop stitch
    Basque stitch
    Blanket stitch
    Blind knot
    Braided chain stitch
    Bulls head
    Bullion knot
    Bullion stitch
    Butterfly chain stitch
    Buttonhole stitch
    Buttonhole wheel
    Buttonhole wheel cup
index    

C
   
    Cable chain stitch
    Cable stitch
    Chain stitch
    Catch stitch
    Caterpillar stitch
    Checkered chain band
    Chequered chain stitch
    Chiara stitch
    Chinese knot
    Chinese stitch
    Closed blanket stitch
    Closed cretan stitch
    Closed feather stitch
    Closed fly stitch
    Closed pearl stitch
    Coil stitch
    Colonial knot
    Coral stitch
    Coral knotted herringbone stitch
    Cretan stitch
    Crewel stitch
    Cross stitch
    Crossed blanket stitch
    Crossed fly stitch filling
index    
D    
    Damask stitch
    Darning stitch
    Detached chain stitch
    Detached wheat ear stitch
    Double blanket stitch
    Double chain stitch
    Double cross stitch
    Double feather stitch
    Double herringbone stitch
    Double knot stitch
    Double running stitch
index    

E
   
    Encroaching satin stitch
index    
F    
    Feather stitch
    Feathered chain
    Figure 8 knot
    Fishbone stitch
    Flat stitch
    Fly stitch
    Fly stitch filling
    Forbidden stitch
    French knot
index    

G
   
    German interlacing stitch
    German knot
    God’s eye stitch
    Grub knot
index    

H
   
    Half crossed blanket stitch
    Head of the bull stitch
    Heavy braid chain stitch
    Heavy chain stitch
    Herringbone stitch
    Herringbone Ladder filling stitch
    Holbein stitch
index    

I
   
    Indian herringbone stitch
    Interlaced band
    Interlaced herringbone stitch
    Interlaced running stitch
index    
J    
    Japanese stitch

K
   
    Knot stitch
    Knotted cable chain stitch
    Knotted chain stitch
    Knotted cretan stitch
    Knotted herringbone stitch
    Knotted loop stitch
    Knotted pearl stitch
index    

L
   
    Laced herringbone stitch
    Laced running stitch
    Ladder stitch
    Lazy daisy
    Leviathan stitch
    Line stitch
    Long armed feather stitch
    Long french knot
    Long tailed daisy
    Looped running stitch
index    

M
   
    Magic chain stitch
    Maidenhair stitch
    Mossoul stitch
index    

N
   

O
   
    Ojo de dios
    Old english knot stitch
    Open chain stitch
    Open cretan stitch
    Open fishbone stitch
    Open loop stitch
    Opened fishbone stitch
    Outline stitch
    Oyster stitch
index    

P
   
    Paded satin stitch
    Palestrina stitch
    Parallel running stitch
    Pearl knot
    Pekinese stitch
    Persian stitch
    Petal chain stitch
    Pistil knot
    Plaited fly stitch
    Plaited stitch
    Point de cable
    Point de chainette
    Point de riz
    Point de sable
    Porto rico rose
    Portugese stem stitch
    Post stitch
index    
Q    
    Queen anne stitch, The

R
   
    Raised chain band
    Raised fishbone stitch
    Raised spider’s web wheel
    Reverse chain stitch
    Reversed Palestrina
    Ribbed spider wheel
    Rice stitch
    Rice grain stitch
    Roman chain stitch
    Rope stitch
    Rossette stitch
    Russian chain stitch
    Running stitch
index    

S
   
    Satin stitch
    Scottish cretan stitch
    Scroll stitch
    Seed stitch
    Seeding stitch
    Side to side stem stitch
    Slipped detached chain
    Single feather stitch
    Smyrna stitch
    Smyrna cross stitch
    Snail trail
    Sorbello stitch
    Split back stitch
    Split stitch
    Stalk stitch
    Stepped running stitch
    Stem stitch
    Straight stitch
    Square chain stitch
    Square stitch
index    

T
   
    Tacked herringbone stitch
    Tambour stitch
    Tete de la boeuf
    Threaded back stitch
    Threaded herringbone stitch
    Tied coral stitch
    Tied herringbone stitch
    Triple palestrina
    Tulip stitch
    Twilling stitch
    Twisted chain stitch
    Twisted daisy border stitch
    Twisted fly stitch
    Twisted lattice band
    Two sided line stitch
    Two sided stroke stitch
index    
U    
V    
    Vandyke chain stitch
index    

W
   
    Wheat ear stitch
    Weaving stitch
    Whipped back stitch
    Whipped buttonhole stitch
    Whipped chain stitch
    Whipped fly stitch
    Whipped running stitch
    Whipped satin stitch
    Whipped spider wheel
    Whipped stem stitch
    Witch stitch
    Worm stitch
    Woven bar
    Woven circle
    Woven oval
    Woven spider wheel
    Woven trellis stitch
index    
X    
Y
   
    Y stitch

Z
   
    Zig zag cable chain stitch
    Zig Zag chain stitch
index    

herringbone ladder filling stitch

Posted by on 10 Mar 2009 | Category:

Also known as : Interlaced Band

This variety is similar to that of the stepped running stitch (variety 2) and takes a braided effect. It is done over two parallel lines of ‘stepped’ back stitches. Such a foundation helps to create braid like effects.

stepped back stitch
Stepped back stitch: Lay the foundation by doing two parallel back stitches. ‘Step’ the second as illustrated.Note that by stepping the two parallel stitches, A1 falls in the mid point of A2 and B2. Similary, B2 falls in the mid point of A1 and B1.

 


   
herringbone ladder filling stitch       herringbone ladder filling stitch 2
Fig 1: Take another thread and bring it out through A2. Take it under A2-B2 and then under A1-B1, from the bottom. Make sure not to pluck the fabric underneath.   Fig 2: Continue the needle from beneath the thread, to take it under B2-C2, as shown.

   
herringbone ladder filling stitch 3   herringbone ladder filling stitch 4
Fig 3: Take the needle  from beneath the thread and pass it under B1-C1, from the bottom.   Fig 4: Continue this ‘twisted’ pattern to give it a final braided effect. Remember to take the needle always beneath the thread before going under the back stitches.

   
herringbone ladder filling stitch 5
Fig 5: The completed pattern would look like this. Note how the herringbones between the backstitches grow out and close in at the two curves.

 

basic stitches

Posted by on 01 Jan 2009 | Category:

Stitching or sewing has a history dating back to the prehistoric times. It is believed, with archaeological evidences, that sewing must have come into being since the stone ages, when people had begun to sew to attach pieces of animal skin using needles made of bones, antlers and ivory. They probably must have used threads made of animal parts like veins.

As the times progressed and sewing started to become an integral part of life, not only newer methods of sewing styles developed, but many other materials were tried as needles and threads. For many thousands of years, sewing or stitching was done exclusively by hands. Later, machines which helped to assist sewing and weaving were developed. The invention of sewing machines in 19th century and computerization in the 20th century, led to a revolution in the textile industry with mass production of sewn objects.

Although sewing or stitching is commonly associated with clothing and fabrics, it must not be forgotten that this skill is used in many other craft areas like making shoes, bags, sporting goods and all those things associated with attaching pieces of fabric. Sewing also comprises a wider range of art in the textile industry like embroidery, tapestry, quilting, applique, weaving etc…

This tutorial will deal with one of such arts: hand embroidery, which is very much practiced even today in spite of all the invasion of machine-made,
‘perfect’ sewn objects. It should be admitted, though, that it is a dying art with hobbyists finding lesser time and patience. On the flip side, hand embroidery is an important means of livelihood to many people in different countries.

There are more than 400 types of different stitches from around the globe and even more types of hand embroideries. When certain stitches are combined in certain ways to create a certain style of stitching, it is known as hand embroidery. The stitches and associated hand embroideries can speak volumes of the history of its people, culture and times.

This section of the tutorial will teach you the various stitches. These stitches are categorized based on certain families they belong to. These families are distinguished based on the nature of technique used to create a parrticular stitch. It is possible that some stitches belong to more than one family, but effort has been made to minimize the confusion. 

Hand sewing is an art to be perfected with patience and perseverance. It helps us in creative expression and ultimately gives us a satisfaction that most
other hobbies can give. Happy learning…happy stitching. :)
 

sarah’s hand embroidery tutorials

Posted by on 26 Dec 2008 | Category:

To begin with, it is always nice that we start with the history of things. When did embroidery begin cannot be really told though we can only assume that it has been around ever since man began to cloth himself. Every culture had developed the art of needlework, from egyptians, to the moors, to the indians, to the chinese. There had also been exchange of the art of embroidery between cultures and countries over the ages and each one took them to mix it with their tastes and brought forth an enhanced version.

If we were to start learning the different embroideries of the world, it would take us more than a lifetime. This is what I realised through my short research so far in the world of embroidery. The art with thread and needle has been an ongoing and evolving process since man began to cloth himself. Many hand embroidery styles and knowledge must have been lost through the ages, but some of them have still remained to pull on to stay alive in a world dictated by machines.

To learn embroidery, it is essential that we start with the knowledge of the simplest of stitches. Every embroidery or embroidery style comprises of one or more combinations of different stitches. For instance, the ethnic Kasuti work of India and the Black work of Europe consists of the Holbein stitch, which is an enhanced version of the simple running stitch. So, the ‘Basic Stitches’ section will consist of all the basic and simple stitches categorised into different family of stitches. The ‘Embroidery’ section will consist of different embroideries that uses the stitches that has already been displayed in the ‘Basic Stitches’ section. This way, you should be able to learn how different stitches can be used in practical embroidery work.

I will post a stitch every 3-4 days, and a new embroidery style every 1 - 2 months. The lessons will be illustrative. So, in cases where the words don’t help, just refer to the pictures to follow  the logics and methods of a stitch. You can click on each image of the basic stitch tutorial to see an enlarged and clearer version.:)

The basic stitches and embroideries will be shown on the side bar over the right hand side. In the ‘Basic stitches’ section, I  will start with the most basic stiches and move to more complex ones. So, for beginners, they can follow the order of stitches starting from the top. The ‘Embroidery’ section will have different embroidery styles, each with its own history and lessons to follow.

hand embroidery You would require the following things to begin the lessons:


1. Fabric- A piece of cotton fabric to practice your stitches. When you go through embroidery section, the type and kind of fabric will be specified.
2. A pair of scissors.
3. A set of needles – quilting needles, long needles, tapestry needles, straw needle. These needles have different lengths and thickness and can be used dependig on the type of fabric and thread being used. The tapestry needle is usually used to do embroidery without piercing the fabric.

4. Threads- For basic stitches, a few colorful cotton ‘anchor’ branded  threads or floss can be used. The embroidery section will specify if there is a requirement for any specific kind of thread.

5. A fabric holding ring-  to hold the fabric tight for better stitching. I don’t use a ring, though, for my embroideries. So, I presonally feel it is not a must, but maybe a convenience to some of you.

hand embroidery sample : couching method