Posts Tagged 'french knot'

pearl knot stitch

Posted by on 24 Jun 2011 | Category:

This stitch is a very simple stitch worked from right to left. Make these stitches close enough to see it look like like a string of pearls, which explains the name.

I will be working over a single stitch line.

pearl_knot_1 …. pearl_knot_2
Fig 1: Begin by bringing out the needle at the right end on the stitch line, at a point A. Then, take the needle through B, which lies on the stitch line and bring it out from C, a point right below B. Fig 2: Now, before pulling the stitch A-B tight, take the needle under it as shown. Do not pluck the fabric underneath.
….
pearl_knot_3 pearl_knot_4
Fig 3: Pull the needle out completely to get the first knot. Then, again, take the needle in through D, which lies on the stitch line and bring it out through E, a point right below D. The shorter this stitch, the more ’round’ and ‘pearled’ the look.
Continue the procedure for the entire length of the stitch line.
Fig 4: A completed row of pearl stitch would look like this.
….

colonial knot

Posted by on 06 Sep 2009 | Category:

Also known as: Figure 8 knot

This knot looks pretty much like the french knot, but has a different method of going about. While we wrap around twice in the same direction for the french knot, we wrap around in an ‘8’ shape to make the colonial knot.

To do this stitch, the awareness of french knot is good. This will help us to be clear about the difference between both.

colonial_knot_1   colonial_knot_2
Fig 1: Bring the needle out through the fabric. Now make a little hunch or a twist with the thread as shown in the illustration.   Fig 2: Now, put the needle in through the ‘hunch’ that was made.
     
colonial_knot_3   colonial_knot_4
Fig 3: Wrap the thread around in the other direction of the ‘hunch’ so as to form a sort of ‘8’.   Fig 4: Pull the longer end of the thread to tighten the wrap around the needle and hold it pulled.
     
colonial_knot_5   colonial_knot_6
Fig 5: Now, draw back the needle and put it in through a point near where it had emerged earlier. Make sure the thread is held pulled while doing this so that the wrap does not loosen or fall out of the needle.   Fig 6: The finished colonial knot will look like this.

pistil stitch

Posted by on 17 Aug 2009 | Category:

Also known as: Long french knot
 
This is a decorative stitch. We can also say it is a motif stitch which can be used for the purpose of making flower pistils or similar looking patterns. There is not much hassle in doing the pistil stitch and is just a variation of the french knot. I would say, pistil stitch is to french knot just the way long tailed daisy is to lazy daisy! The only difference is a little longer tail. 😀

It is good if you have the knowledge of french knot before begining this stitch.

pistil_stitch_1           pistil_stitch_2
Fig 1: Bring the needle out through the fabric, say, from point A. Place the needle near A to the point where you want to put in the needle.
Wrap the thread around the needle twice as shown.
  Fig 2: Keep the longer end of the thread pulled with the other hand, as you would while doing the french knot. This keeps the wrap securely held to the needle. Put the needle in through the other end, say point B. You will finish one pistil stitch.
     
pistil_stitch_3   Fig 3: This is how a small gathering of pistil stich will look like.

Note: Dear Ones, this will be my last embroidery stitch lesson for the coming two weeks … as I am going off to the hospital tomorrow (!!) to deliver my first baby 😀 [see >> the pregnant me << here]

bluework lessons

Posted by on 08 Aug 2009 | Category:

This is just to give a feel on how bluework will look like.

Bluework and redwork share the same history. Only that, bluework came as a successor to redwork when a new colorfast blue thread was available in the market. Later, a lot many other colors came into availability and many other threads were experimented with. Contemporarily, bluework has been done in many shades of blue in a single design. I have used anchor thread number 0162 to work on the below given design.

Here is a step by step procedure on how this  design was completed in bluework. Click on the stitch names to go to the lessons of each stitch.

bluework_1   bluework_2
I have traced the design to a white cotton fabric using carbon paper.
 
bluework_3 Back stitch:
I began by making the girl’s face, hands and feet using this stitch.
bluework_4 Lazy daisy:
The flower pattern on the frock is done in lazy daisy. I also made the girl’s eyes and ribbons using this stitch.
bluework_5 French knot:
The best way to fill in dots or small circles is using french knots, which I did on the frock, at the centre of each flower pattern.
bluework_6 Outline stitch:
The outline stitch was used  for the frock, shawl, and hat as it would give a thicker easy flowing look.
bluework_7 Split stitch:
The split stitch looked good for the hair as it would give a thicker look. Two strands of the blue floss were taken and doubled, so that the ‘spliting’ is easy.
bluework_8 Running stitch:
The design on the shawl was apt for a running stitch.
bluework_9 Straight stitch:
I added finer details to the girl by making single straight stitches (single running stitch). I made its eyebrows, eyelashes and the stem pattern on the frock using straight stitches.
bluework_10 Stem stitch:
I used this stitch to do the flowers.
bluework_11 Our finished ‘dutch girl’ would look like this.Click on the image for a bigger version. 

Note: This design helped me to incorporate all the stitches traditionally used in redwork and bluework helping me to explain this lesson to you. Contemporarily, different kinds of straight stitches can be used to work these embroideries.This free design called ‘dutch girl’  has been borrowed from needlecrafter.com.

redwork lessons

Posted by on 08 Aug 2009 | Category:

 
In this tutorial, the step by step process on how I went about finishing this design is mentioned. You may click on the stitch name to go to the lessons of those stitches. I have used anchor thread number 47.

redwork_1   redwork_2
I have traced the design to a white cotton fabric using carbon paper.
 
redwork_3 Back stitch:
I began to start the embroidery with back stitch. Personally, I felt it will be good to make the girl’s legs, hands and face using this stitch.
redwork_4 Outline stitch:
The outline stitch was used  for the frock as it would give a thicker straight looking flow stitch.
redwork_5 Running stitch:
The design on the girl’s frock was apt for a running stitch. Usually, running stitch is good for making strawberry seeds. I used this stitch to even do the glow around the candle light.
redwork_6 Lazy daisy:
All the flower pattern in this design is done in lazy daisy. The girl’s yawning mouth is also done using a single lazy daisy.
redwork_7 Stem stitch:
Just to demonstrate the stitch, I decided to incorporate this into the candle stand.
redwork_8 Split stitch:
I felt the split stitch was apt for the hair as it would give a thicker fuller stitch. I took two strands of the red floss and doubled it, so that the ‘spliting’ is easy.
redwork_9 French knot:
The best way to fill in dots or small circles is using french knots, which I did on the frock and at the centre of each flower pattern.
redwork_10 Straight stitch:
Finally, I gave the finishing touch to the girl by making single straight stitches (single running stitch). I made its eyebrows, eyes, knees, and inside of ribbon using single straight stitches.
redwork_11 Our finished ‘sleepytime girl’ looks like this. :)Click on the image for a bigger version. 

 

Note: This design helped me to incorporate all the stitches traditionally used in redwork and bluework helping me to explain this lesson to you. Contemporarily, different kinds of straight stitches can be used to work these embroideries. This free design called ‘sleepytime girls’  has been borrowed from needlecrafter.com.

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