Posts Tagged 'detached chain stitch'

russian chain stitch

Posted by on 13 Jul 2009 | Category:

As the name suggests, this stitch is found in russian embroideries, usually along with the basic chain stitch. It is made by grouping together three lazy daisy stitches, in a clover shape. Ideally, the first lazy daisy loop would point upward. Since this is a motiff stitch, it is good for borders. So, when you make horizontal borders, the stitches are placed one on the side of the other with the first lazy daisy pointing upwards. When doing a vertical border, they all fall below one another, but again with the first lazy daisy pointing upward.  Of course, I suggest a leniant approach to using this stitch.

I will be doing this stitch in a reverse order since it is easier to stitch this way. (So, you will see the first lazy daisy pointing downwards).  I will work on a vertical border, over three parallel stitch lines.

You need to know atleast the lazy daisy stitch to be able to follow this lesson.
 
russian_stitch_1           russian_stitch_2
 Fig 1: We begin by making the first loop by bringing out the needle from the second stitch line at a point A. Put the needle back in A and bring it out from B. Loop the thread around the needle and pull out the needle.    Fig 2: Now, we make the second loop by putting in the needle back in B and bringing it out from C, which lies at an angle on the first stitch line. Loop the thread around and pull the needle out to make the second loop. 
     
russian_stitch_3   russian_stitch_4
 Fig 3: Anchor up the lazy daisy loop and bring the needle out from B.    Fig 4: similarly, we make the third lazy daisy loop, but this time towards the right side, with D lying at an angle on the third stitch line. 
     
russian_stitch_5   russian_stitch_6
 Fig 5: Once finished, the clover shaped russian chain stitch would look like this. As mentioned before, this is in an upturned position. Ideally, the first loop should point upwards.    Fig 6: A series of vertical russian chain stitches would show up like this (reverse order). You can choose to close them in or space them out.

wheatear stitch

Posted by on 01 Jul 2009 | Category:

This stitch, as the name suggests, resembles wheat or sheaf of wheat when done in multiples. This is a decorative stitch and can be used as per our imagination.

You need to know the detached wheatear stitch. I will be following three parallel stitch lines to demonstrate this stitch.

wheatear_stitch_1   wheatear_stitch_2
Fig 1: Start the base by doing a detached wheatear stitch as shown above. Note that A and C lie on the left and right stitch lines. B and D lie on the centre stitch line.   Fig 2: We now proceed to make more detached wheatear stitches one after the other.
After putting in the needle through D, bring it out through E, then in through D and out through F.
     
wheatear_stitch_3   wheatear_stitch_4
Fig 3: Put the needle in through D again. This completes the second pair of ‘ears’. Bring the needle out through G.   Fig 4: Take the needle beneath the second pair of ‘ears’ and the previous loop to form the second loop of the sequence.
     
wheatear_stitch_5           wheatear_stitch_6
Fig 5: Put the needle in through G to complete the second loop.   Fig 6: Keep up with this procedure to finish the entire stitch line.
   
wheatear_stitch_7   Fig 7: A finished line of wheatear stitch would look like this. I have ended the sequence with the ‘ears’ or a ‘V’ to give it a more wheat sheaf look. Try this stitch on curves as well.

  

detached wheatear stitch

Posted by on 26 Jun 2009 | Category:

This is one of the few stand alone stitches from the chain stitch family. This stitch resembles the Bull’s head stitch, and often even mistaken with it. But there is a small difference in the way they are stitched. Moreover, a detached wheatear stitch is a single loop of the Wheatear stitch, which will be the next stitch to be posted.

 Knowledge of bull’s head stitch will help you understand the difference and logc behind both stitches. Knowledge of the reverse chain stitch will be an advantage.

detached_wheatear_stitch_1         detached_wheatear_stitch_2
 Fig 1: We start by making the ‘ears’ of the wheat seed. For that, we pull the needle out through A and put it in through B, as shown. Then, the needle is pulled out through C. Note that B lies at about 90 degrees angle between A and C.    Fig 2: We now make the other ‘ear’ of the wheat seed. For that, put in the needle through B and bring it out through D. D lies straight below the point B.
     
detached_wheatear_stitch_3         detached_wheatear_stitch_4
 Fig 3: Now, we follow a reverse chain stitch procedure to make the wheat seed. For that bring the needle out from D and take it underneath the previously made stitches without plucking the fabric beneath.    Fig 4: Put the needle in through D again to finish up the stitch.
     
detached_wheatear_stitch_5    Fig 5: A finished detached wheatear stitch would look like this. It is a lot in resemblance to the bull’s head stitch. If you note, here, the loop of the chain lies under the ‘ears’ or ‘horns’ , unlike that in the bull’s head stitch. 🙂

bull’s head stitch

Posted by on 23 Jun 2009 | Category:

Also known as : Tete de la Boeuf, Head of the Bull Stitch

This stitch is one of the few stand alone stitches of the chain stitch family. The name tells us that the stitch resembles the head of a bull. This stitch is often confused with detached wheatear stitch, since they look a lot like each other. But, there is a small difference in the way both are worked. The difference lies in the way the ‘horns’ of the bull is made.

You need to know the lazy daisy stitch to be able to do this stitch.

bulls_head_1                bulls_head_2
Fig 1: We start by making the horns of the bull. So, bring out the needle through A and put it in through B. Continue to bring the needle out through C, which lies at a 90 degrees angle from A and B. Note that the thread lies below the needle causing it to bend to a ‘V’ shape.   Fig 2: We now proceed to make the face of the bull using a lazy daisy stitch. So, pull out the thread from C. Put the needle again through C and bring it out from D, which lies straight below C. Now, loop the thread around the needle as shown to make the lazy daisy stitch.


 

   
bulls_head_3   Fig 3: Anchor up the lazy daisy as shown and finish the bulls head. Note that the lazy daisy stitch is done over the bent thread. Keep this in mind while you go through the detached wheatear stitch. It will help you to understand the difference between both. 😉 

  
 

tulip stitch

Posted by on 20 Jun 2009 | Category:

Also known as: Slipped Detached Chain

This is among the few detached stitches in the chain stitch family. The name of the stitch is derived from its resemblance to the tulip flower. So, this stitch can be used to make tulip flower patterns or it can become a small part fo a bigger flower…of course, the imagination is yours! It can also be used as a filling in stitch to fill up patterns.

To be able to do this stitch, you need to know the lazy daisy stitch.

tulip_stitch_1                tulip_stitch_2
Fig 1: Start by doing a lazy daisy stitch as shown above.
Consider that A is the base of the lazy daisy and B is the tail.
  Fig 2: After putting in the needle thru B, bring it out thru C. C lies at about a 90 degrees angle from B and is about 2/3rd the distance from A. Note that this is just an approximate measurement I am using for a typical tulip stitch. You need not be strict about it.
Now, take the needle beneath the ‘tail’ of lazy daisy without plucking the fabric.

   
tulip_stitch_3   tulip_stitch_4
Fig 3: Now put it in through D which lies symmetrical to C.    Fig 4: A finished tulip stitch would look like this.

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